“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

Barack-Obama-Ancestral-Home-Ireland-(12).jpg
 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

Barack-Obama-Ancestral-Home-Ireland-(35).jpg
 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

Barack-Obama-Ancestral-Home-Ireland-(25).jpg
 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

Barack-Obama-Ancestral-Home-Ireland-(23).jpg
 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

 “My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”  On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland. During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19. Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson. American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take. There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.

“My name is Barack Obama, of the Moneygall O’Bamas and I’ve come home to find the apostrophe we lost somewhere along the way.”

On 23 May 2011, President Barak Obama and his First Lady, Michelle Obama, visited  the small village of Moneygall, the president’s ancestral home, as part of a visit to Ireland.
During the 2008 presidential campaign, an Irish-American genealogist found that then-Sen. Obama had a great-great-great-grandfather named Falmouth Kearney, a Moneygall resident who left for the US at 19.
Although its population of roughly 320 people is smaller than the typical entourage of an American president on a foreign state visit, Moneygall has wholeheartedly embraced its most famous great-great-great-grandson.
American flags and Irish tricolors line the village’s main street, which is crammed with as much Obamiana as the place can take.
There’s the Obama Cafe and Gift Shop, which sells T-shirts reading “Is Feidir Linn” (Gaelic for “Yes We Can”), hurling sticks with the president’s face and reproductions of Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama portrait superimposed over pictures of Moneygall.